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  • Treating male retention patients with temporary prostatic stent in a large urology group practice

    Roach M. Richard, MD Advanced Urology Institute, Oxford, Florida, USA

    Men with either chronic or temporary urinary retention symptoms are common patients treated in a urology practice. Both indwelling and intermittent catheterization are widely used to treat this condition. These approaches are associated with significant complications including infection and reduced quality-of-life. Infection is a target for quality improvement and cost reduction strategies in most care settings today. We use a temporary prostatic stent (TPS) to address these issues in our practice. In this report, we describe our approach to patient selection, sizing, placement and follow up of 214 TPS placed in 56 men with chronic or temporary urinary retention in an office setting. With the first stent placement, average indwelling time was 27 days. Thirty-two patients had multiple stents placed. Replacement was performed routinely and was generally required because underlying comorbidities precluded surgery. In these patients, an average of six stents were placed (range 2-18) with average dwell times of 31 days. Symptomatic urinary tract infections (SUTI) occurred in only 6 of 214 TPS placements (2.8%), resulting in an incident rate of 0.93 SUTI per 1,000 TPS days. TPS is a safe and efficacious means of alleviating symptoms of urinary retention. TPS does not share the same infection risk profile or quality-of-life drawbacks associated with urinary catheters; this makes TPS use relevant as a urinary catheter alternative or when a urinary catheter is not recommended.

    Keywords: benign prostatic hyperplasia, LUTS, urinary retention, lower urinary tract symptoms, temporary prostatic stent,

    Apr 2017 (Vol. 24, Issue 2, Page 8776)
  • UroLift system for relief of prostate obstruction under local anesthesia

    Barkin Jack , Giddens Jonathan , Incze Peter , Casey Richard , Richardson Stephen , Gange Steven, MD Humber River Regional Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Many men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) forego therapy because they are dissatisfied with current treatment options. While surgical resection and ablation using many different forms of energy remain the reference standard for BPH treatment, many men seek a less invasive technique that will improve symptoms but not risk the complications associated with tissue removal. The Prostatic Urethral Lift opens the prostatic urethra with UroLift (NeoTract Inc., Pleasanton, CA, USA) permanent implants that are delivered under cystoscopic visualization. The implants literally 'hold open' the lateral prostatic lobes creating a passage through the obstructed prostatic urethra. Voiding and symptoms are significantly improved without the morbidity or possible complications following prostate resection. The entire procedure can be readily performed using local anesthesia. As with all new implant procedures, the technique has evolved with experience. The objective of this article is to describe the most current technique for the delivery of the UroLift implant in order to achieve maximal impact on symptom relief.

    Keywords: prostate, LUTS, photovaporization, outpatient, 980-nm/1470-nm diode laser,

    Apr 2012 (Vol. 19, Issue 2, Page 6217)
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Jun 2017, Vol.24 No.3
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