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HOW I DO IT


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  • Treating male retention patients with temporary prostatic stent in a large urology group practice

    Roach M. Richard, MD Advanced Urology Institute, Oxford, Florida, USA

    Men with either chronic or temporary urinary retention symptoms are common patients treated in a urology practice. Both indwelling and intermittent catheterization are widely used to treat this condition. These approaches are associated with significant complications including infection and reduced quality-of-life. Infection is a target for quality improvement and cost reduction strategies in most care settings today. We use a temporary prostatic stent (TPS) to address these issues in our practice. In this report, we describe our approach to patient selection, sizing, placement and follow up of 214 TPS placed in 56 men with chronic or temporary urinary retention in an office setting. With the first stent placement, average indwelling time was 27 days. Thirty-two patients had multiple stents placed. Replacement was performed routinely and was generally required because underlying comorbidities precluded surgery. In these patients, an average of six stents were placed (range 2-18) with average dwell times of 31 days. Symptomatic urinary tract infections (SUTI) occurred in only 6 of 214 TPS placements (2.8%), resulting in an incident rate of 0.93 SUTI per 1,000 TPS days. TPS is a safe and efficacious means of alleviating symptoms of urinary retention. TPS does not share the same infection risk profile or quality-of-life drawbacks associated with urinary catheters; this makes TPS use relevant as a urinary catheter alternative or when a urinary catheter is not recommended.

    Keywords: benign prostatic hyperplasia, LUTS, urinary retention, lower urinary tract symptoms, temporary prostatic stent,

    Apr 2017 (Vol. 24, Issue 2, Page 8776)
  • How I do it: percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA)

    Sorokin Igor, Chamarthy Murthy, Cadeddu A. Jeffrey, MD Department of Urology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation has seen increased utilization secondary to the rising incidence of renal cell carcinoma. This has been shown to be an effective and durable treatment especially in the elderly comorbid patient. In this article, we describe our technique and factors related to successful outcomes.

    Keywords: percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, RFA, thermal ablation, renal mass, kidney cancer, renal cell carcinoma,

    Feb 2017 (Vol. 24, Issue 1, Page 8679)
  • How I do it: Aquablation of the prostate using the AQUABEAM system

    MacRae Catriona, Gilling Peter, MD Department of Urology, Tauranga Hospital, Tauranga, New Zealand

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) represents one of the most common conditions encountered in urological practice. For many years, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has been considered the gold standard for surgical management of symptoms in prostates of 30 cc-80 cc. Although TURP provides excellent functional outcomes, there is significant morbidity associated with the procedure, particularly with regards to bleeding, electrolyte imbalance and sexual dysfunction. Emerging technologies aim to maintain the excellent functional results of TURP whilst decreasing the adverse events experienced by the patient. Aquablation is a novel therapy using a high-velocity waterjet and real-time ultrasound imaging with robotic assistance for targeted removal of prostate tissue. We present our experiences with this new technique, the equipment required and steps involved.

    Keywords: benign prostatic hyperplasia, transurethral resection of prostate, ablation techniques, aquablation, bladder outlet obstruction,

    Dec 2016 (Vol. 23, Issue 6, Page 8590)
  • How I do it: Same day discharge for transurethral resection of prostate using Olympus PlasmaButton and PlasmaLoop

    Pham Ryan, Parke Jacob, Kernen M. Kenneth, MD Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Auburn Hills, Michigan, USA

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common conditions affecting older men. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has widely been considered the gold standard in surgical treatment for BPH. However, this procedure remains largely an inpatient procedure. Inpatient admission ultimately adds to healthcare cost and patient morbidity. In this article, we present an alternative methodology to treat BPH using combination Olympus PlasmaButton and Olympus PlasmaLoop therapy. Preliminary results from our experience suggest improved hemostasis with adequate resection, allowing a majority of our patients to be discharged the same day of the procedure. We describe our novel technique as a safe and effective way to possibly treat BPH in an outpatient setting.

    Keywords: benign prostatic hyperplasia, transurethral resection of prostate, monopolar- transurethral resection of prostate, bipolar- transurethral resection of prostate, continuous bladder irrigation, transurethral vaporization of prostate,

    Oct 2016 (Vol. 23, Issue 5, Page 8491)
  • Acupuncture for hot flashes in men treated with androgen deprivation therapy

    Hirsch M. Lior, Goldstein E. Larry, MD Department of Urology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia Pennsylvania, USA

    In men with advanced carcinoma of the prostate being treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), hot flashes can be a significant side effect of the treatment. In this paper we describe using acupuncture as a complementary alternative therapy for treatment of hot flashes in men.

    Keywords: acupuncture, hot flashes, androgen deprivation therapy,

    Aug 2015 (Vol. 22, Issue 4, Page 7938)
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Apr 2017, Vol.24 No.2
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