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HOW I DO IT


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  • How I Do It: Managing bone health in patients with prostate cancer

    Barkin Jack, MD Humber River Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Urologists have two scenarios where they have to address bone loss or increased risk of fractures in men with prostate cancer. In the first setting, a patient who has been started on androgen deprivation therapy may develop cancer-treatment-induced bone loss. In the second setting, a patient’s prostate cancer may have metastasized to the bone. This article describes six steps to manage bone health in patients diagnosed with prostate cancer in a community practice.

    Keywords: prostate cancer, managing bone health,

    Aug 2014 (Vol. 21, Issue 4, Page 7399)
  • Robot assisted radical prostatectomy: how I do it. Part II: surgical technique

    Valdivieso F. Roger , Hueber Pierre-Alain , Zorn C. Kevin, MD Hopital St. Luc Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    The introduction of the "da Vinci Robotic Surgical System" (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) has been an important step towards a minimally invasive approach to radical prostatectomy. Technologic peculiarities, such as three-dimensional vision, wristed instrumentation with seven degrees of freedom of motion, lack of tremor, a 10x-magnification and a comfortable seated position for the surgeon has added value to the procedure for the surgeon and the patient. In this article, we describe the 9 step surgical technique for robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) that is currently used in our institution (University of Montreal Hospital Center (CHUM) - Hopital St-Luc). We use the four-arm da Vinci Surgical System. Our experience with RARP is now over 250 cases with the senior surgeon having performed over 1200 RARPs and we have continually refined our technique to improve patient outcomes.

    Keywords: surgical techniques, prostate cancer, robot assisted radical prostatectomy,

    Dec 2013 (Vol. 20, Issue 6, Page 7073)
  • Robot assisted radical prostatectomy: how I do it. Part I: patient preparation and positioning

    Valdivieso F. Roger , Hueber Pierre-Alain , Zorn C. Kevin, MD University of Montreal Hospital Center (CHUM)-Hopital St. Luc, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    Radical prostatectomy remains the standard treatment for long term cure of clinically localized prostate cancer, offering excellent oncologic outcomes, with cancer-specific survival approaching 95% at 15 years after surgery. The introduction of the `da Vinci Robotic Surgical System` (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) has been another important step toward a minimally invasive approach to radical prostatectomy. Technologic peculiarities, such as three-dimensional vision, wristed instrumentation with seven degrees of freedom of motion, lack of tremor, a 10x-magnification and a comfortable seated position for the surgeon has added value to the surgeon and patient. In this first part of a two article series, we describe preoperative patient preparation and positioning protocols for robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) that are currently used in our institution (University of Montreal Hospital Center (CHUM) – Hopital St-Luc). We use the four-arm da Vinci Si Surgical System. Our experience with RARP is now over 250 cases with the senior surgeon having performed over 1200 RARPs and we have continually refined our technique to improve patient outcomes.

    Keywords: surgical techniques, prostate cancer, robot assisted radical prostatectomy,

    Oct 2013 (Vol. 20, Issue 5, Page 6957)
  • High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)

    Barkin Jack, MD Humber River Regional Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    INTRODUCTION: Curative treatments for localized prostate cancer, from least invasive to most invasive, include brachytherapy, cryosurgery, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, external beam radiation therapy, and radical prostatectomy. A patient with localized, low risk or intermediate risk prostate cancer who is diagnosed at an early age and receives one of these treatments has only an approximately 50% chance of maintaining an undetectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, good spontaneous erections, and total continence by 5 years after treatment. OBJECTIVE: This article discusses transrectal high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of localized prostate cancer using the Sonablate 500 (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN, USA) device, which the author has adopted in favor of the Ablatherm (EDAP, TMS S. A., Lyons, France) device, the other HIFU device approved for use in Canada. METHOD: Characteristics of the ideal prostate cancer include stage T1-T2b, less than 40 cc in size, and with an anterior-posterior dimension of up to 35 mm high. The anterior zone of the prostate is treated before the posterior zone. The procedure involves 2 to 3 second bursts of ultrasound energy, followed by 3 second cooling cycles. In each treatment lesion, the physician achieves a temperature of 100 C at the focal point. The device allows for real-time visualization of tissue response following the delivery of ultrasound energy. CONCLUSION: HIFU is a minimally invasive, outpatient treatment for localized prostate cancer that provides similar short term and medium term cure rates and considerably less morbidity and side effects than other treatments. Although the effectiveness of HIFU has not yet been demonstrated in large, long term studies, this treatment option should be discussed with patients who have just been diagnosed with low risk or intermediate risk prostate cancer and desire aggressive, noninvasive, curative therapy, with potentially a lower incidence of side effects compared to conventional therapy.

    Keywords: prostate cancer, HIFU,

    Apr 2011 (Vol. 18, Issue 2, Page 5634)
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